Blog Archive

275 @ Myung-Ga Korean Restaurant.

/
2 Comments
Not every time I can write a very good post. A good one isn't easy to write, it ain't hard either. It's in between, but it certainly takes time, it takes a lot of efforts, and inspiration (especially when you're juggling with your work, you still, make your own time to blog , that's a dedicated blogger I must say.) I never want to simply just throw a few pictures and name them 'a post'or a  'please read my blog', it's not a blogger's job, but beggar. 
So, life has been good, to everyone I assume. 
My blog is not up-to-date, I've been racing with time ... Hoho. It's always good to keep yourself busy. I love keeping myself busy, it means I didn't waste time. I am always, perpetually occupied. And now, I'm awake, still awake because the Red Bull I had earlier on, had taken place; or perhaps my mind is too busy to sleep, I have a strong desire to write this up before hitting the sack. 



People always ask me which Korean Restaurant is nice, which is nicer compare to xxx, which one cheaper, and all sorts of questions. I have totally no idea which is nice, which is good, which restaurant left me the most fondest memories. Hah, now I found one and that's why you're reading this. 
As I always do, carrying a curious and adventurous feeling to try out every new restaurant. Satisfied is the word that comes to mind to describe the feeling of venturing Myung-Ga.

Situated in Klang, facing the main highway, a superlatively-big signboard that definitely will draw your attention. Upon entering the restaurant, I can see all the friendly staffs smiling ear to ear to greet us , and I felt so homey instantly. ;) I think service is also one of the most important factors that people/customers keep coming back for more. 

Banchan
Banchan -반찬

Whilst kimchi is generally part and parcel of banchan, this tapas style display of side dishes goes far beyond the kinchi side dish and can make or break the Korean meal . Banchan are a testament to the vast variety of Korean cooking and an average meal will come with three or four different banchan, as well as kimchi and radish, however at Myung-ga  you can easily double that number. 


Types of imported Korean drinks...
I personally recommend the grape juice. *grin*

Korean food is actually a robust gastronomical attack.
 The main dishes always come with a plethora of banchan (assorted side dishes encompassing a vastly wide range of flavors. Visitors( like me) either despise or love it's rich tastes, its potent spiciness, its acidic tartness, and its stroke-inducing saltiness. The Koreans are very proud of their food, although they have no doubts that it is not suited to all tastes and I have been told that Koreans are very dedicated to their food. In fact, I only know this last year when I traveled to Korea. Despite very well known for the food there, the second most attractive thing I've found was the ..ahem, pretty ladies... ;P


OK, back to the topic, do you love pork? If yes, you must order this. 

Dwaeji Galbi. 
Marinated and grilled pork ribs. RM35(200g), RM65(400g)




Korean BBQ  -  삼겹살, 갈비,  불고기, etc. (Samgyeopsal, Galbi, Bulgogi, etc)

You can either choose to grill this yourself or let the friendly garcon serve you.

Kim Chi Jeon( RM28)
Korean spicy Pan cake, if you like spicy and piquant delicacies, you have to try this. 
A flat fiery dough, pan fry until frangrant, with a just-nice-spicy aroma in it. <3 I fell in love at the first bite.

Tteobokki rice cake and vegetable simmered in Red Hot Pepper paste. RM20

The first and fondest memory of Korean cuisine I must say - Tteobokki. I never keen to try out any korean restaurant because I once had a selfish thought, that is - Kim Chi doesn't taste good, so Korean Food don't taste good either. But ever since I took a first bite of the chewy rice cake, coated with a tangy sweet red pepper sauce, I went madly in love with Korean Cuisine. You can imagine how powerful are they?;P


File:Korean cuisine-Bibimbap-08.jpg
Dolsot Bibimbap( Bibimbap served in hot stone)RM25


비빔밥 - Bibimbap 

Bibimbap which literally means rice with mixed vegetables, is to Korea as the hamburger is to America.
Totally unique, and with a somewhat iconic appearance, this spicy dish is served like some kind of wheel of fortune using a plethora of different ingredients in varying color, almost always topped with a golden yellow yolk. Given the amount of banchan that never get finished in most of the Korean restaurants, bibimbap makes economical sense, using all the leftovers to form a new dish. Any number of banchan can be used in bibimbap and it generally accepted that the more there are , the better it is. These vegetables are loaded onto a bed of rice, then topped with flaming red, spicy gochujang (red chili paste) All the ingredients in Bibimbap are meat to be mixed together thoroughly before eating. My favorite part of eating Dolsot is you get to eat the charred rice cooks on the bottom. Crispy and golden, and the dish stays warm throughout the meal.


 As you can see, the bowl consists of a lone egg surrounded by bean sprouts, carrots, cabbage, sliced mushrooms, rice and minced pork. The trick is to mix the dish quickly before serving. So is this any good?




Sam-Gyae-Tang
Sam-Gyae-Tang, literally means ''ginseng chicken soup'' It is believe that this soup can prevent illness and improve blood circulations. It is traditionally served in the summer for its supposed nutrients. 
It ain't simple as what you can see. There's rice stuffed in the chicken, all you need to do is gently tear off the breast, let the rice soak up as much soup as it can, and eat it, like congee. (Half rice/ half porridge texture)
It has a slight ginseng aroma in the soup as well to replenish the nutrient . Very nutritious one I would exclaim!



Godeungeo Gul. RM29
Grilled Mackerel .It was remarkably fresh and simply delicious.

Soju (Korean Rice Liquor)RM40

Alcoholic Drinks – 소주, 막걸리 (Soju, Maggkoli)
Korea has a somewhat belligerently strong drinking culture, of  epic proportions. It may come as no surprise then, that the national alcohol drink is held close in the hearts of many, and is more often than not a part of the Korean dining experience. The aforementioned drink issoju, a clear potent spirit made from rice, with a taste akin to both sake and vodka.  Soju is normally drunk straight from shot glasses, although it can be mixed with beer or juices. Whilst soju is the most commonly drunk alcohol, there is also a second beverage that makes quite a regular appearance on a Korean dining table and that is 막걸리 - Maggkoli. This fermented Korean rice wine comes in many guises, from the cheap, fizzy tasting bottled version, to the slightly more expensive served in a bowl type.  It is always drunk from a small bowl and has a taste that is in equal measures creamy like milk, and sour and gassy like a beer. There are many other unique alcohols in Korea, but these two are the clear winners in terms of popularity.

Shredded vegetables with chili seeds.




Look at the caramelized-glazed pork!!
It's shimmering like stars, beckoning me to eat'em!



Wrap it and gobble it!!
Trust me, one is never enough.

Danhobak jeon. RM22
Pan fried sweet pumpkin.
Here we have another version of the Jeon(pancake). We had  a sweet pumpkin pancake instead of the spicy and salty one.
Both taste equally delicious I must say.
Something similar with our english breakfast where comes with the pancake, except for the greasy part. 

Jokbal Stemed Pig Feet. RM55
This is definitely the star of the night. 
Very fine and evenly sliced Pork trotter... No foul smell, nothing, but flavorsome, some inexplicable joy just overwhelmed me after  tossing one after another into my mouth!*saliva oozing out*


Gun Mandoo Fried Dumplings. RM20
 Mega juicy and awesome minced pork envelop in slippery smooth and slightly charred outer skin.
I am speechless. Speechless with delight. One of the most addictive gyoza I've tried before.
I think overall this place is fantastic, with beyond average services and delicious food. Highly recommended for Korean food lovers. 





MYUNG-GA BBQ RESTAURANT

88E IMS2 Jalan Batai Laut 4, 
Taman Intan,
 Klang.
019- 392 7777




You may also like

2 comments:

  1. so many types of imported can drinks! :D

    ReplyDelete
  2. You are right. Is not easy to write a good post. But you are doing a good job coz i enjoy reading your post! Keep it up =)

    ReplyDelete

@EuniceEunny. Powered by Blogger.

Popular Posts

Google Analytic Code